Which USA Visa is the Best?

We are often asked for this. All wants to know what the best USA visa for their is. The answer is always the same: It depends!

Are you coming to the U.S. just to visit on holidays? Do you want to attend school here? Work here? Do you have family here? These are all things that can affect which visa you should be applying for.

Of course, you can always consult with our experienced immigration attorneys and we are happy to help you determine which visa is best for you –New Jersey Immigration lawyers or New York Federal Deportation Lawyer

We have also put together the following guide, which gives an idea about the various visas and which one might be best for you.First of all, though, it’s important to know the 3 general visa categories.

Nonimmigrant Visas
Nonimmigrant isas are temporary and may include various temporary work, study and holiday isas, all of which offer the opportunity to stay in the US for a few years.

The essential thing to know about nonimmigrant visas is that they are reserved specifically for those who don’t intend to try to immigrate or remain in the US. Most of these visas require applicants to prove that they will stay in the country only temporarily— for example, by maintaining a permanent residence in their home country.
Visa types that fall into the nonimmigrant visa category include the B-i visa for individuals wanting to temporarily enter the US for business purposes, the B-2 visa for those wishing to come to the US for tourism, pleasure or medical treatment, the M and F isas for students wishing to study at a US academic institution and the J visa for those wishing to do an educational exchange in the US.

Immigrant Visas.
 Immigrant visas are for those wiio wish to legally immigrate to the United States, meaning they want to live and work in the country permanently. The requirements for immigrant visas are generally the most stringent— and will require the greatest amount of time and paperwork.

There are various routes to permanent residency (a green card) in the US. These visas most often require sponsorship, either by an immediate family member (like a spouse or fiance(e), parent, brother or sister) or by an employer.
An exception to the sponsorship requirement is offered by the Diversity Immigrant Visa Program, which provides visas to residents of countries with low rates of immigration to the US without requiring a sponsor. Special immigrant visas are also available for certain religious workers and adopted children, among others.

Dual-Intent Visas.
 Dual-intent visas are interesting because though they are technically not an immigrant visa, they waive the major requirement of nonimmigrant isas: proving you do not plan to remain in the US. Dual intent basically means that the visa holder does intend to immigrate at some point in the future, although he or she currently wishes to maintain nonimmigrant status in the US.
Visa types that fall into the dual-intent visa category include the H-iB visa for specially* occupations, such as academics or physicians, and the L-i visa, which is designated for intra-company transfers. Note that the L-i visa is specifically designated for employees who are in an executive, managerial or othenvise specialized role in the company. Dual intent also extends to H-4 and L-2 dependents of H-i and L-i visa holders.